Health Sciences

Research in the Department of Health Sciences’ degree programmes (Advanced Nursing Practice, Occupational Therapy, Midwifery, Music Therapy and Physiotherapy) centres on the numerous mechanical and physiological effects of psychosocial and emotional stress, and their implications for preventive and clinical practice.

The regulatory capabilities of an organism are indicative of the efficacy of a particular form of therapy or care. All research in the Department of Health Sciences originates from the widely-held perception in molecular biology that the body’s self-healing powers are only fully effective in a state of vagotonia (or relaxation). (See Tracy, 2002)

A holistic perspective – incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects of patients’ everyday lives – and approaches stemming from the salutogenic model are an integral part of all health science degree programmes at the IMC University of Applied Sciences Krems. Such a resource-based perspective shifts attention onto the origins of health.  Joint use of technical (e.g. HRV measuring devices) and psychometric survey instruments help to exploit synergies between the various degree programmes.

This common understanding also serves to enhance the effectiveness of interdisciplinary cooperation in preventive and therapeutic care settings.  Joint use of technical (e.g. HRV measuring devices) and psychometric survey instruments help to leverage synergies between the various degree programmes. 

An illness begins at the very moment when the body’s regulatory mechanisms cannot handle certain disruptions. It is not life under abnormal conditions, not the disruption as such, that engenders an illness, but rather an illness has its origin in the insufficiency of the regulatory apparatus.

Rudolf Virchow (1868)